We'll take care of matters so
you don't have to.

Deputyship and the Court of Protection

Should a family member become mentally incapacitated, and not have a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) or Enduring Power of Attorney (EPA) in place, it will be up to the Court of Protection to deal with their affairs. Their assets will be frozen until an application for ‘Deputyship’ is made to the Court of Protection – which allows either a relative, friend or court appointed professional Deputy to take over the running of their affairs.

Deputyship applications can be costly, confusing and upsetting – but we are experienced in this area, and can provide you with guidance and advice throughout. This includes the application process, being appointed and managing the person’s affairs. If a suitable Deputy is not available, then a professional can also take on this role – and we have specialist solicitors who can be appointed to act as a Deputy instead. We can also make other applications to the Court of Protection if required – for example to make a statutory Will or to approve a gift.